Tag: engagement

What Do Employees Say Outside of Work?

September 14th, 2016   •   no comments   

employee-engagement-quotes-simon-sinekYour employees seem happy. You haven’t really noticed any major discontent. But what are they saying to their family? Their friends? When was the last time you paid attention to the values you espouse and how they are being enacted in the workplace? Do you really know your current culture and how your employees feel about it?

Just as it is important to know what your customers are saying about your products and services, it is critical to understand your employees’ needs and concerns.  What does it mean for your company if the employees are complaining about company integrity,lack of accountability, refusal or inability to innovate and lack of leadership?  Do you want to know, or is ignorance bliss?  And if you do know, what do you do about it- brush it off because what do they know anyway?

Leaders take heed. Employees are brand messengers and at the same time representatives of the culture. Don’t ignore their messages. Give them an opportunity to be heard at work and take seriously what they say.  Compare what they say to what you would like them to be saying. How big is the gap? Do something or not? Ignore them at your own risk and the risk of your company’s sustainability.

Were They Stressed When You Hired Them?

September 7th, 2016   •   no comments   

energized new hireEmployees that interview well and ultimately get hired show enthusiasm, confidence and engagement. They are not a bundle of stress and anxieties. Who wants to hire and deal with that?  Yet a glance inside most companies finds a high percentage of employees who are stressed out and lacking engagement.  What happened? They didn’t come this way.

Many employers justify this change by saying that “this is the big leagues and what we do is hard” and employees need to suck it up and keep going. Sounds like they are trying out for the movie role of a Marine drill sergeant.

Conditions at work are what cause employee stress most of the time. It can come from unreasonable bosses, stressed-workerunreasonable workload, lack of collaboration, lack of voice, lack of decision making authority, being used in a position that does not take advantage of a person’s skills or talents or any combination of them.

People welcome a challenge at work, particularly if presented in the right way;  if it allows them to do what they do best  and if they have the right team around them to be successful.  Much stress is not from the challenge itself but from the absence of the factors that enable employees to successfully meet it.

If you see stressed out employees, what do you do? Do you consider it normal? Do you want to reduce it, and if so, have you considered how? If not, you are complicit in the erosion of your own human assets that are costing your organization big money. Remember, they didn’t come to you this way. What are you going to do to undo what your company has done to them?

When Times Get Tough, Will Culture Make or Break the Company?

August 31st, 2016   •   no comments   

Those that join the military learn quickly about unit discipline.  All of the toughness and craziness of basic training is designed to get soldiers to respond to certain situations that the drill instructors know they will face, and to respond in a disciplined, planned manner. In business, employees do not get that sort of training.  So when the wheels start coming off the wagon, how will they respond?

Aug 31_2016_make or breakQuestions to consider:

  • When costs rise or margins are cut, bringing profits down, how does leadership respond? Are values ignored to chase the next big sale? Or to make the next big cut in expenses?
  • Are behaviors toward customers in keeping with company values? Would a cut in customer service staff erode the customer loyalty built up over the years, so that the cut in expenses would actually result in a decrease of sales?
  • If a company has been big on employee development, reward and appreciation, but has to cut out certain programs, will they just forget about them, or will they find another way to show that appreciation?
  • Will employees break “unit discipline” to bolster their sales numbers, or take shortcuts in service or production?
  • Does the company discuss the importance of maintaining the culture in the face of tough times, no matter what? Are the consequences of difficulties cause the culture and values to be diluted or abandoned and a survival mode of  “anything goes” sets in?

Tough questions. How would your organization answer them? Any thoughts you might have?

Build a Culture of Employees Who Work For The Love of It

August 3rd, 2016   •   no comments   

Founders and leaders of companies may find it easy to work for the love of it.  Their time spent creating an idea that becomes a company is full of passion and love. They have a strong sense of pride and investment in the organization. It is like they have given birth to something that they want to nurture, cherish and grow to become something great.  What if they could pass on that same sense ownership to their employees?

Consider Bobby Jones who was the most successful amateur golfer ever to compete at a national and international level. When asked why he never went pro, he answered, ”for the love of the game.”  How powerful would it be to have a full staff complement of employees want to sign up for something that gives them meaning and purpose?  We can look at the individuals that join the Peace Corps or VISTA and want to capture their passion.  We can stand in awe of the doctors that go to the front lines of war with Doctors Without Borders; and the lawyers fighting the death penalty for convicted felons.  They have passion for what they do.  They are joining established organizations because in their gut, the organization represents who they want to be.

Aug_3, 2016_for the love of itCompany leaders ideally want to hire people who can be that passionate about their work.  It is not an easy task.  It is easier if the leader exhibits the passion, paints the vision, sets the example and shares the values that will enable a prospective employee to get it intellectually and then feel it.  As the organization grows, every person doing the hiring needs to be able to do the same thing.  And it can’t be phony- it is not just for the purpose of an interview.  Every company needs to live it, breathe it and reinforce it continuously.  It can be done. It takes work, it takes awareness, it takes mindfulness.

People want believe in something. They want their time spent at work to be meaningful. Help them make it so.  Is your passion shared by your employees? If not, are you willing to do what it takes to get them there?  Are you willing to  build a culture of employees who work for the love of It?

Beware of Knee Jerk Leadership

July 20th, 2016   •   no comments   


July20_2016_ knee jerk_leadershipLeaders are people too. They react to triggers, they get their buttons pushed just like everyone else.  But one of the competencies that a leader is supposed to have is the ability to ignore it when those buttons are pushed.  They are supposed to know that bad decisions happen when they are purely emotional, based on anger or some immediate unexpected event that provokes them.

Organizations expect their leaders to be able to make smart decisions under all circumstances.  Decisions need to be rational, whether they are based on a lot of data points or one view.  Leaders need to always remember that their decisions are signals to their employees and to those outside the organization who may be impacted by them. That, in decision making there is a thought process at work  and there is consistency with the vision and mission of the organization.

Leaders who are reactive and who shoot from the hip might like to think of themselves as “cowboys” in the heroic sense, while they be petrifying everyone around them.  Leaders need to give their teams a sense of security, of predictability, and of caring- caring that the decisions will be made with their well-being in mind.

Knee jerk reactions are the antithesis of the above.  They create employees who are afraid to be in front of the boss and afraid of what the boss may do when others are in front of him or her.  And fear does not fit in a strong culture

If you are leader with a quick trigger, learn to count to 100, giving you time to think before you act. You will make better, more consistent decisions and you will get better results all around.  What are your thoughts?

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