Tag: results

Some Shortcuts Are Dead Ends

October 19th, 2016   •   no comments   

dangerinshortcuts_10192016It is always exciting to find a shortcut, especially one that saves time and aggravation. There is a great feeling in missing three blocks of traffic by making a quick turn you never knew existed. Shortcuts at work can provide the same type of satisfaction. But what needs to be considered is what is being sacrificed by taking a particular new route.

Process innovation is important as long as the core values of the organizations and the quality of the products or services are maintained or enhanced.  Saving two days in production time by bypassing Quality Control or Safety procedures is a big shortcut- but it leads to a big dead end.  The time saved up front will lead to huge cost and time expenditures down the road. And it represents a major pivot on ethical, integrity, and best practice standards.

Shortcuts present themselves every so often.  Make sure they are not fool’s gold.  They can ruin you. Sometimes the path not taken should not be taken for good reasons. Do you consider the consequences of each potential shortcut before taking it? If not, beware.

The Value Of Lessons Learned

October 12th, 2016   •   no comments   


A lot can be learned from listening to sports coaches when they talk about not getting too high over a victory or too low over a loss.  Everything has to be kept in perspective. In business, mistakes happen, all kinds of disasters occur, and sometimes they result in doors closing.  On the other hand, there can be a surprise win- landing a big account, vaulting ahead of the competition. But being number one can be short lived. Neither troubled times nor great times are going to be permanent.  What can we learn from both conditions?

lessonslearned10122016_Fighter pilots file after action reports. Football players review game films to go over what went well and what did not.  Business leaders can use similar practices to use the past to help build the future.

The practice followed by many successful leaders is “review, reflect and revise”.  This involves more than just evaluating the end game. It means applying the process to every plan, every play, every role and player from inception through  to  conclusion. This simple process leads to catching mistakes before they happen and become disasters, snatching success from the possibility of failure.

Rather than being the leader that celebrates every success and bemoans every failure, are you willing to join the league of leaders that uses an ongoing approach to continually learn lessons from what has come before and use them to advise their future?

Too Much Bluster – Too Little Breadth

August 24th, 2016   •   no comments   

Every company wants to put its best foot forward, be it in the public eye, or in individual sales situations.  Talk is around the strengths, the unique features, all of the things that make the company great.  As we know, there is a fine line between extolling existing virtues and puffery. Puffery sometimes isn’t bad.  But extreme puffery moves toward bluster and that evolves  into hubris.  Often times, this change is so subtle that there is very little awareness of the damage.

August 24_2016_VirtuousHubris is dangerous. Selling on hubris is detrimental in many ways.  Picture a small business that lands a big sale or big account based on the CEO overselling both product and service capabilities. The great news is they got the contract- the bad news is they got the contract and have no way to deliver on it.  Suppose the company drops all other work in process to service this one piece of business that can move the company into the big leagues.  What does that do to existing customer relationships? What does it do to the culture of the company when everyone is forced to drop what they are doing and focus- in a very rushed, maybe frantic manner- on something they haven’t done before. They may not have the necessary experience or expertise, which means creating a solution that is not proven, or spending a huge amount of time on research to build a solution. Or it may mean that the company has to bring on more people quickly to service the account, without properly vetting them and integrating them into the culture.


Be careful of bluster. It is only a step away from the cliff.  As you slip over the cliff, you may be reconsidering whether it was worth it, but by then it is too late.

Build a Culture of Employees Who Work For The Love of It

August 3rd, 2016   •   no comments   

Founders and leaders of companies may find it easy to work for the love of it.  Their time spent creating an idea that becomes a company is full of passion and love. They have a strong sense of pride and investment in the organization. It is like they have given birth to something that they want to nurture, cherish and grow to become something great.  What if they could pass on that same sense ownership to their employees?

Consider Bobby Jones who was the most successful amateur golfer ever to compete at a national and international level. When asked why he never went pro, he answered, ”for the love of the game.”  How powerful would it be to have a full staff complement of employees want to sign up for something that gives them meaning and purpose?  We can look at the individuals that join the Peace Corps or VISTA and want to capture their passion.  We can stand in awe of the doctors that go to the front lines of war with Doctors Without Borders; and the lawyers fighting the death penalty for convicted felons.  They have passion for what they do.  They are joining established organizations because in their gut, the organization represents who they want to be.

Aug_3, 2016_for the love of itCompany leaders ideally want to hire people who can be that passionate about their work.  It is not an easy task.  It is easier if the leader exhibits the passion, paints the vision, sets the example and shares the values that will enable a prospective employee to get it intellectually and then feel it.  As the organization grows, every person doing the hiring needs to be able to do the same thing.  And it can’t be phony- it is not just for the purpose of an interview.  Every company needs to live it, breathe it and reinforce it continuously.  It can be done. It takes work, it takes awareness, it takes mindfulness.

People want believe in something. They want their time spent at work to be meaningful. Help them make it so.  Is your passion shared by your employees? If not, are you willing to do what it takes to get them there?  Are you willing to  build a culture of employees who work for the love of It?

Set Boundaries – Not Bars

July 27th, 2016   •   no comments   

We have lived through the age of process improvement as Nirvana.  We have discovered that checklists are great but they are not the whole answer.  Efficiency and productivity are very important, but not  to the point where they totally stifle innovation and the individual desire to search for ways to do things differently because they are better, not just different.

July_27_2016_prisonA culture is not- or at least should not be – a cage. It should be a set of values with behaviors attached to them, that create space for employees to do what they do best, feel good about what they are doing and to develop their skills and abilities so that they can continue to improve themselves and add value to the company. Cultures do have boundaries, as does any larger culture within which we may reside.  But employees need room to make decisions, to experiment, to try out new ideas in the right places in the right way and at the right time.  If those opportunities are built into the culture, then employees will have an allowed way to stretch themselves, to bring new ideas out that can help the company in ways that are beneficial.

July27_2016_ boundariesNobody wants to feel as if they are just checking boxes. It might be easy, but it is not fulfilling. People do want to make a difference. A culture should give everyone room to be a hero in some way.  Has your company put up obstacles to this type of success? If so, how can you remove them and still remain productive and efficient?

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